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  • News
  • November 09, 2017

Rapid Access Addiction Medicine Clinic announced for Cambridge and North Dumfries

$1.3 million allocated to Waterloo Region to Combat the Opioid Crisis

Ontario has allocated $1.3 million to expand services preventing opioid addiction and overdose across Waterloo Region.

Included is $274,000 to establish a Cambridge-North Dumfries Rapid Access Addiction Medicine Clinic. Operated by House of Friendship, it will be staffed by an addictions physician, peer worker, and counsellor with clinical expertise in community withdrawal management.

“Preventing opioid addiction and overdose is key to Ontario’s overall strategy to combat the complex opioid crisis,” said Kathryn McGarry, MPP Cambridge.

“These funds will assist our partners who are working collaboratively in their critical work in helping communities across Ontario address harm reduction and addiction treatment. This serious health issue needs a coordinated and comprehensive approach to saving lives and improving outcomes for our residents and this support will benefit families and communities in Ontario.”

In total, the Waterloo Wellington Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) received $2.3 million from Ontario to combat opioid addictions across Waterloo Region and Wellington County, announced Nov. 9, 2017, by MPP McGarry and Daiene Vernile, MPP for Kitchener Centre.

The funding is part of $222 million announced province-wide, as part of Ontario’s Strategy to Prevent Opioid Addiction and Overdose. The Waterloo Wellington LHIN worked in partnership with local addiction and mental health service providers to allocate the funding to initiatives that will have the greatest immediate impact in addressing the current opioid crisis.

How the Money is allocated

The Waterloo Wellington LHIN, will provide the following organizations $1.3 million in base and one-time funding to support ongoing and new initiatives to prevent opioid addiction and overdose:

Funding allocated to base budgets:

CMHA

$270,000 -- Enhancements to Flexible Assertive Community Treatment (FACT) teams to meet the needs of highly complex clients with significant substance use challenges.

House of Friendship

$180,000 -- Kitchener-Waterloo-Wilmot-Woolwich-Wellesley Rapid Access Addiction Medicine Clinic (RAAC).  It will be staffed by an addictions physician, peer worker, and counsellor with clinical expertise in community withdrawal management. 2 days/week

$94,000 -- Enhanced Withdrawal Management Supports to support Rapid Access Addiction Clinic (RAAC) follow-up for Kitchener-Waterloo-Wilmot-Woolwich-Wellesley.

$180,000 -- Cambridge-North Dumfries Rapid Access Addiction Medicine Clinic. It will be staffed by anddictions physician, peer worker, and counsellor with clinical expertise in community withdrawal management. 2 days/week

$94,000 - Enhanced Withdrawal Managements supports to support RAAC follow-up for Cambridge-North Dumfries.

One-Time funding:

Grand River Hospital

$59,900 -- Addition of Registered Nurse to Withdrawal Management Centre, capacity for more complex clients and increased flow. Additional counselling capacity at Withdrawal Management Centre.

eHealth Centre of Excellence

$75,000 -- Toolbar for primary care in EMR highlights morphine equivalents to assist with decreasing opioid doses and use.

House of Friendship

$81,800 -- Day treatment and outreach, including enhanced services and supports for pregnant women struggling with substance use.

$180,000 -- Residential Addictions Treatment expansion and enhancement, including follow up care

CMHA

$120,000 -- Bridging support in Colleges and Universities, link in Emergency Departments. Builds on existing supports offered in suicide prevention initiatives.

QUICK FACTS

  • Announced in fall 2016, Ontario’s comprehensive Strategy to Prevent Opioid Addiction and Overdose is ensuring people in pain receive appropriate treatment, increasing access to holistic treatment for those with opioid use disorder, and improving the safety and health of people who use opioids, including access to the life-saving drug naloxone.
  • Over the next three years, Ontario is investing more than $222 million province-wide to combat the opioid crisis in Ontario, including expanding harm reduction services, hiring more front-line staff and improving access to addictions supports across the province.
  • Naloxone kits are distributed for free across Ontario. Find the location nearest you.
  • Ontario is establishing an Opioid Emergency Task Force that will include a province-wide representation of front-line workers and people with lived experience to strengthen the province’s coordinated response to the opioid crisis.

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